November 26, 2005

News & stuff

A small spate of ed news, from another piece by Jay Mathews on AP classes (the guy's persistent!) to Mathews' discussion of parental involvement vs. academic focus in a study on California API results (whoever thinks that the API is a decent measure? Hmmph), the NY Times on state test v. NAEP threholds for different normative values like "proficient" (remember, folks, all "proficiency" ratings are arbitrary cuts that create ordinal scales), and the Washington Post on Margaret Spellings' trying to be flexible on NCLB (or, to borrow language from Yes, Prime Minister, trying to look as if she's trying to be flexible, because even if others are probably aware that she's trying to look as if she's trying to be flexible, there's no guarantee that they're not trying to look as if they're not probably aware that she's trying to look as if she's trying to be flexible).

The big one, which may or may not be big in reality, is the announcement that the Department of Education will be inviting a limited number of states to be piloting growth models. I've been observing the discussion of growth or value-added models of student achievement for more than a decade, and I'll have something to say on this in the next few days, but I've got some other projects that take precedence this weekend—a hobby rocketry science project to be the flunky for, some bills to pay, some articles to finish prepping for Education Policy Analysis Archives, etc.

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Posted in Education policy on November 26, 2005 7:12 AM |